The Psychology of Writing: 5 Ways to make your Characters “Click” with Readers using Vulnerability, Proximity, Resonance, Similarity, and Shared Adversity

cutsceneaddict:

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At some point in your life, you’ve experienced magic.

It might have appeared as a sudden spark of unexplainable creativity, the lyrics of a deeply moving poem, the chemistry between two individuals meeting for the first time, the notes of a concert, the dedicated synchronization of a routine, the innovative strokes of an artist’s brush…

An overwhelming sense of connection bound you in the moment. You felt inspired, thrilled, advanced, even enlightened. You feel nostalgic each time emotions of this memory are triggered by a sound, a word, an image, a touch, or a smell. The experience of this moment cannot be put any other way: it is pure magic.

As writers, we strive to create this inexplicable magic through words, with the ultimate goal of connecting with our readers. In giving our readers this sensation of “magic,” we instill a feeling of nostalgia within them that they will carry for the rest of their lives.

In this article, I’ll be discussing a unique, psychological-based approach to creating this connection, built on collected research from noted organizational expert and psychologist Ori & Rom Brafman. Read on to learn five ways in which you can make your book and characters “click” with your readers.

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bemusedlybespectacled:

liamgalgey:

Mike Wazowski joins the Avengers.

THOR’S HAMMER IS BLOCKING HIS FACE I AM DYING

October is Filipino American Heritage Month

racismschool:

Happy Filipino American Heritage Month Everyone!

Dual purpose meme and group art eyyy; Day 1: Any Pokemon

Dual purpose meme and group art eyyy; Day 1: Any Pokemon

1863-project:

tigertwo1515:

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OKAY, LET’S TALK ABOUT ROBERT SMALLS (BECAUSE HE HAS A NAME, THANK YOU VERY MUCH).
ANYWAY.
Robert Smalls was born into slavery in 1839 and. at the age of 12. his owner leased him out in Charleston, South Carolina. He gravitated towards working at the docks and on boats and eventually became the equivalent of a pilot, and in late 1861 he found himself assigned to a military transport boat named the CSS Planter.
On the 12th of May, 1862, the white officers decided to spend the night on land. Smalls rounded up the enslaved crew and they hatched a plan, and once the officers were long gone they made a run for it, only stopping to pick up their families (who they notified) along the way. Smalls, disguised as the captain, steered the boat past Confederate forts (including Ft. Sumter) and over to the Union blockade, raising a white sheet his wife took from her job as a hotel maid as a flag of truce. The Planter had a highly valuable code book and all manner of explosives on board.
Smalls ended up serving in the Union Navy and rose to the rank of captain there. He was also one of a number of individuals who talked to Abraham Lincoln about the possibility of African-American soldiers fighting for the Union, which became a reality.
After the war, Smalls bought his owner’s old plantation in Beaufort and even allowed the owner’s sickly wife to move back in until her death. He eventually served in the South Carolina House of Representatives (1865-70), the South Carolina Senate (1871-74), and the United States House of Representatives (1875-79) and represented South Carolina’s 5th District from 1882-83 and the 7th District from 1884-87. He and other black politicians also fought against an amendment designed to disenfranchise black voters in 1895, but it unfortunately passed.
Smalls ended his public life by serving as U.S. Collector of Customs in Beaufort from 1889-1911. He died in 1915 at the age of 75.
And now you know Robert Smalls. ROBERT SMALLS IS THE MAN!

1863-project:

tigertwo1515:

Source

OKAY, LET’S TALK ABOUT ROBERT SMALLS (BECAUSE HE HAS A NAME, THANK YOU VERY MUCH).

ANYWAY.

Robert Smalls was born into slavery in 1839 and. at the age of 12. his owner leased him out in Charleston, South Carolina. He gravitated towards working at the docks and on boats and eventually became the equivalent of a pilot, and in late 1861 he found himself assigned to a military transport boat named the CSS Planter.

On the 12th of May, 1862, the white officers decided to spend the night on land. Smalls rounded up the enslaved crew and they hatched a plan, and once the officers were long gone they made a run for it, only stopping to pick up their families (who they notified) along the way. Smalls, disguised as the captain, steered the boat past Confederate forts (including Ft. Sumter) and over to the Union blockade, raising a white sheet his wife took from her job as a hotel maid as a flag of truce. The Planter had a highly valuable code book and all manner of explosives on board.

Smalls ended up serving in the Union Navy and rose to the rank of captain there. He was also one of a number of individuals who talked to Abraham Lincoln about the possibility of African-American soldiers fighting for the Union, which became a reality.

After the war, Smalls bought his owner’s old plantation in Beaufort and even allowed the owner’s sickly wife to move back in until her death. He eventually served in the South Carolina House of Representatives (1865-70), the South Carolina Senate (1871-74), and the United States House of Representatives (1875-79) and represented South Carolina’s 5th District from 1882-83 and the 7th District from 1884-87. He and other black politicians also fought against an amendment designed to disenfranchise black voters in 1895, but it unfortunately passed.

Smalls ended his public life by serving as U.S. Collector of Customs in Beaufort from 1889-1911. He died in 1915 at the age of 75.

And now you know Robert Smalls. ROBERT SMALLS IS THE MAN!

looktothenightxai:

meloromantics:

appropriately-inappropriate:

audreyvhorne:

sttinkerbelle:

vmpolung:

knowledgeandlove:

Photo source
Fact check source

#and I just don’t feel entitled to someone else’s life’s work.

That comment exactly!! It’s not mine and I can survive without it, so I will.

This is why honey is not vegan.

The problem here is that honey, especially if you buy it ethically from an apiarist, isn’t actually detrimental to the well-being of the bee or the hive. In the wild, honey is used as a food stock, but in a domesticated honeybee colony, the bees are fed quite well, and so the honey is a surplus.
The alternatives, like sugar, relies on monocrops in third world countries, with transient labour. Growing up, there was a sugarcane field by my house, and I’m sure the Haitian men who worked backbreaking hours hacking a machete through knife-bladed leaves in 40 degree heat for a couple dollars a day would have traded a testicle to be a Canadian honeybee. Stevia’s going the same way, iirc.
Additionally, apiarists are actually huge proponents and activists for sustainable bee-keeping, and it’s estimated that the domesticated hive may be the last great hope for declining populations, because we can optimize their chances for survival.
It’s their life’s work, sure, but it’s not the death of them to use it responsibly.

literally read anything about the history of sugarcane and the cuban sugar industry if you think sugar is or ever has been more ethical than honey

Honey any time over sugar thanks.

looktothenightxai:

meloromantics:

appropriately-inappropriate:

audreyvhorne:

sttinkerbelle:

vmpolung:

knowledgeandlove:

Photo source

Fact check source

#and I just don’t feel entitled to someone else’s life’s work.

That comment exactly!! It’s not mine and I can survive without it, so I will.

This is why honey is not vegan.

The problem here is that honey, especially if you buy it ethically from an apiarist, isn’t actually detrimental to the well-being of the bee or the hive. In the wild, honey is used as a food stock, but in a domesticated honeybee colony, the bees are fed quite well, and so the honey is a surplus.

The alternatives, like sugar, relies on monocrops in third world countries, with transient labour. Growing up, there was a sugarcane field by my house, and I’m sure the Haitian men who worked backbreaking hours hacking a machete through knife-bladed leaves in 40 degree heat for a couple dollars a day would have traded a testicle to be a Canadian honeybee. Stevia’s going the same way, iirc.

Additionally, apiarists are actually huge proponents and activists for sustainable bee-keeping, and it’s estimated that the domesticated hive may be the last great hope for declining populations, because we can optimize their chances for survival.

It’s their life’s work, sure, but it’s not the death of them to use it responsibly.

literally read anything about the history of sugarcane and the cuban sugar industry if you think sugar is or ever has been more ethical than honey

Honey any time over sugar thanks.

artofmaquenda:

There were some people interested in more views of the jackdaw legs, so here are a bunch of them!

Look how amazing..

alt-j:

my latest masterpiece

alt-j:

my latest masterpiece

oceanshex:

longwinter:

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l’héritage en couleur by David Revoy: website | deviantart

this is heartbreaking

arabaean-nights:

when ur friend does something problematic then they try to justify it and look at u for support

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Not In Nottingham
Mumford & Sons

sweetlittlesunflower:

If you haven’t heard the Mumford and Sons version of this song, listen now and prepare for tears.

cassbuttstiel:

An accurate representation of tumblr right now

cassbuttstiel:

An accurate representation of tumblr right now

autisticenjolras:

don’t use uteruses as symbol for feminism ok

here’s why:

  • you’re excluding trans women
  • you’re including some trans men
  • you’re excluding cis women who may not have a uterus because they’ve lost it because of or to avoid #cancer 

stop doing this it’s so gross